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Water & Sewer

Where does "city water" come from?
What happens when the water gets here?
Water Quality Report
Water Residential Assistance Program

Where does "city water" come from?

All of the water in our public watermains comes from the Great Lakes Water Authority (GLWA). The GLWA has a 40 year lease with the City of Detroit for management and control of the regional water and sewer system assets. The water system that take water from the Detroit River and Lake Huron and treat it to make it safe to drink. The water is then distributed in large watermains throughout the metropolitan Detroit area.

The Great Lakes Water Authority supplies City of Detroit residents and three million suburban residents through wholesale arrangements with 127 communities. The GLWA is comprised of six board members:  two from the City of Detroit, one each from Wayne, Oakland and Macomb Counties, plus one representing the State of Michigan.

Services provided by the GLWA are regulated by both the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as well as the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality and various other regulatory agencies.

GLWA’s water supply system is one of the largest in the nation in terms of water produced and population served. The system has been the sole provider of all water service in the City of Detroit since commencement of water supply as a public service in the mid nineteenth century. In addition the system began providing wholesale service to surrounding municipalities in 1940.

The water supply system draws fresh water from the Great Lakes system which is naturally available with Lake Huron to the north, the Detroit River to the south and Lake St. Clair to the east. GLWA’s water network consists of 790 miles of transmission lines in the service area. GLWA’s five water treatment plants pump 650 million to 1.3 billion gallons of water per day. Visit the GLWA website.

What happens when the water gets here?

Farmington Hills taps into these large GLWA transmission mains, and through our own system, transports the water to the homes and businesses in Farmington Hills. Fire hydrants are located along these lines so that most of the City has fire protection. Valves that can cut off the flow of water are regularly spaced along the watermain so that if there is ever a reason to shut the main down, a minimum number of customers will be out of water.

The City of Farmington Hills contracts with the Water Resources Commissioners Office for the operation and maintenance of the City’s watermains and sanitary sewer lines. In addition to the operation and maintenance of the water system various other activities are handled through the Water Resources Commissioners Office such as:

Contracted services: Watermain breaks, lawn repairs, pavement repairs and replacement Programs: Cross connection, bacteriological and chemical water sampling Customer Services: Meter reading, meter installation and processing of water bills General and Administrative: Accounting, staff training, insurance and property liability, alarm and parameter notification system and various other overhead expenses.

Although the Water Resources Commissioners Office provides the above-mentioned services to the City, the local water system is owned by the City of Farmington Hills. The Water Resources Commissioners Office provides these services as staff to the City based on our code of ordinances through a contractual agreement.

Water Quality Report

Water Quality Report
 

The City of Farmington Hills tests water quality on a regularly prescribed schedule as required by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality.  These test results are published in the annual Consumer Confidence Report (CCR), which is mailed to all Farmington Hills water customers.  The most recent report, mailed in May 2016, is a summary of testing for the 2015 calendar year.  

Lead is one of the many parameters that are monitored in the City’s water system through testing performed at a number of residential water customer locations.  In 2015, all water samples had levels of lead that were undetectable.  Only laboratory results with a detectable level are included in the CCR, so lead levels are not detailed in the report.

Further information on the regional water system and current drinking water regulations is available at the Oakland County Water Resources Commissioner's Office website.

Water Residential Assistance Program

Water Residential Assistance Program